Jonesing for the Holidays

Jonesing for the Holidays

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By Bromwich+Smith Staff | 942 words | Reading Time: 4 minutes and 42 seconds | Date: 2021/12/03

As the holiday season approaches, after the last few years we’ve all had, we may be craving everything the holiday season brings more than ever.  When we think of cravings especially as it relates to the holidays, there is this feeling of wanting to do it “up”. From having that shot of Baileys in our coffees, to an extra pile of bacon with our side of eggs, to cookies for breakfast, or a ridiculous amount of lights on our houses; we all want to celebrate this year. There is an element of Jonesing and wanting to Keep up with the Joneses in order to get our holiday fix. So, how does one define Jonesing and Keeping up with the Joneses to appease our desires without having our cravings define us?

What is “Jonesing” anyway?

According to Wikipedia the “Joneses” phrase originates with the comic strip Keeping Up with the Joneses, created by Arthur R. "Pop" Momand in 1913 till 1940. The strip depicts the social climbing McGinis family, who struggle to "keep up" with their neighbors, the Joneses of the title. The phrase Keeping up with the Joneses has remained popular ever since. 

In the early 1960s, a “jones” was a craving—but strictly a craving for drugs. As it continued to be used, “jones” expanded to describe any sort of severe longing or craving, whether for food or a relationship or a shiny new sports car.

As we gear up for the holidays and all the celebrations, family traditions and memories of holidays gone by we may Jones for the holidays and also want to Keep up with the Joneses.  While many of us tend to “Jones” throughout the year, this festive time can exaggerate it in a wide variety of ways. 

So, after not being able to celebrate the season in the same room as our extended family and friends we are all yearning for those connections, those memories, those hugs.  We understand these desires so here’s a brief list of tips to manage this holiday season without Jonesing or Keeping up with the Joneses. 

Holiday Tip:

1. Set manageable expectations.

Be realistic and upfront about what you and your family can do. Make a list of what is possible and prioritize your most important events and activities for you and your family. Then, pace yourself. Organize your time. Keep in mind that it’s the holiday “season” so spread out your activities to lessen stress and increase enjoyment.    

2. Do something for someone else.

Even if this has been a difficult year for you and your family, helping others will help you too, as your focus will move from your own circumstances into serving others. There are always people who can use a helping hand. 

3. Enjoy activities that are inexpensive or free.

There are many good holiday-related activities that will add to your family’s enjoyment that are either free or low-cost such as driving around to look at Christmas decorations, decorating your home together, baking Christmas cookies, going window-shopping, or playing in the snow.

4. Try something new.

Traditions are great, but sometimes we can find ourselves in a rut, celebrating the holidays in exactly the same fashion, year after year. Think about finding a new way to celebrate the holiday season this year. You may create a new tradition that will keep going for generations!

5. Create a shopping list with a spending plan. 

The holiday season always brings with it a “Jonesing” to spend a lot of money, especially when it comes to purchasing presents. Don’t be afraid to say no to this temptation. The following is simple but good advice for everyone: Don’t spend beyond your means and don’t rack up significant credit card debt. Your January self will thank you for it. 

6.  Remember the holiday season does not eliminate sadness or loneliness.

For some, the holiday season evokes painful memories from recent events or the loss of loved ones. Give room for yourself and your family to experience and express these feelings. But try not to let them become a consuming focus. Make an effort to work through present challenges and conflicts.

7. Acknowledge the past but look toward the future.

Life brings changes. Each season of life is different. Determine to enjoy this holiday season for what it is. Acknowledging the past, whether it was good or bad, is appropriate. But, if you find that this year has been a rough one and you don’t anticipate having the best holiday season ever, try not to set yourself up for disappointment by comparing today with the “good old days.” Take advantage of the joys the present holiday season has to offer.

8.Carve out some time for yourself!

Don’t take on all of the responsibilities of your holiday celebrations by yourself. Share the load. For example, assign responsibilities to your friends, family members for preparation and clean-up of your holiday meals. Remember to create some space during the holidays for you to recharge your own batteries as well.

We hope that these tips will guide you through the holiday season ensuring that your “Jonesing” for it doesn’t break the bank or cause undue anxiety. While at the same time, “keeping up with your neighbours” will be more about saying hi and wishing them the best for the holiday season.  For more tips on holiday season, please check out our pervious blog in below:

Finally, if you are facing overwhelming debt, remember you’re not alone. Bromwich+Smith has a number of debt relief strategies to help you regain control of your finances and get your life back. Now offering video appointments with clients, Bromwich+Smith’s Debt Relief Specialists are available for an initial free, confidential, no obligation consultation by phone at 1.855.884.9243 or request a call back at our contact us page.

 

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